Last edited by Makus
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of non-cooperative parallel reduction machine for lazy functional languages found in the catalog.

non-cooperative parallel reduction machine for lazy functional languages

Laura Jean Babbitt

non-cooperative parallel reduction machine for lazy functional languages

by Laura Jean Babbitt

  • 66 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Functional programming languages.,
  • Parallel programming (Computer science)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Laura Jean Babbitt.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 161 leaves ;
    Number of Pages161
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13591469M

    Learn You Some Erlang for Great Good! Post date: 31 Oct This book is a way to learn Erlang for people who have basic knowledge of programming in imperative languages (such as C/C++, Java, Python, Ruby, etc) and may or may not know functional programming (such as Haskell, Scala, Erlang, Clojure, OCaml, etc). The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages. Post date: 01 Dec Describes how to translate a high-level functional language into an intermediate language, called the lambda calculus, and its implementation using lazy graph reduction.

    Implementing functional languages: a tutorial. Post date: 24 Oct A practical approach to understanding implementations of non-strict functional languages using lazy graph reduction. Programmed graph reduction has been shown to be an efficient implementation technique for lazy functional languages on sequential machines. functional programs in a parallel machine with.

      ISBN: OCLC Number: Language Note: English. Description: 1 online resource (x, pages): illustrations: Contents: C A portable assembly language --The brisk machine: A simplified STG machine --A Haskell to Java Virtual Machine code compiler --Common subexpressions are uncommon in lazy functional languages --With-loop-folding . I'm trying to find some interesting abstract machines that support lazy graph reduction. Haskell implementations seem to prefer the Spineless Tagless G-Machine (GHC, NHC, YHC), and the G-Machine (Hugs). I've heard that Clean is based on the ABC Machine, but .


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Non-cooperative parallel reduction machine for lazy functional languages by Laura Jean Babbitt Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book gives a practical approach to understanding implementations of non-strict functional languages using lazy graph reduction. The book is intended to be a source of practical labwork material, to help make functional-language implementations `come alive’, by helping the reader to develop, modify and experiment with some non-trivial compilers.

The unusual aspect of the book [ ]Cited by:   6 Implementing Functional Languages on Sequential and Parallel Machines Graph Reduction The Spineless G-machine Relating the Graph Reduction Model to the Typed Lambda Calculus Compiling Code for Evaluation Transformers Drawing it Together 7 Relationship to Other Work Abstract Interpretation PolymorphismCited by:   T.

Johnsson. The v, g-machine: An abstract machine for parallel graph reduction. In Proceedings of the Workshop on the Implementation of Lazy Functional Languages, Aspenäs, Göteborg, Sweden, 5–8, September Google ScholarCited by: 7.

G2 implements lazy reduction rules on a typed, functional, machines for functional languages like OCaml and Haskell tend to do closure conversion instead for direct access to the environment.

Secondly, since most parallel functional language implementations are based on the concept of graph reduction, the issues raised by graph reduction are discussed. Finally, the paper concludes with a case study of a particular parallel graph reduction machine and a survey of other parallel by: George L An abstract machine for parallel graph reduction Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Functional programming languages and computer architecture, () Silbermann F and Jayaraman B Set abstraction in functional and logic programming Proceedings of the fourth international conference on Functional programming.

We extend it with datatype constructors and base values, so the final machine implements all dynamic aspects of a lazy functional language. 1 Introduction The development of an efficient abstract machine for lazy evaluation usually starts from either a graph reduction machine or an environment machine.

Abstract. Design considerations of a coarse grain parallel architecture for functional languages are presented. These include extensibility, the separation of computation and control of parallelism, the introduction of partially shared memories, a cluster concept and a conceptually centralised loadbalancing mechanism.

This paper describes a garbage collector for an implementation of a lazy functional language using parallel graph reduction.

The garbage collector is an extension to the Appel-Ellis-Li garbage collector. The extension consists of two parts: Firstly, generations has been added: this often decreases the garbage collection time with nearly 20%. In computer science, functional programming is a programming paradigm where programs are constructed by applying and composing is a declarative programming paradigm in which function definitions are trees of expressions that each return a value, rather than a sequence of imperative statements which change the state of the program.

In functional programming, functions. Implementing lazy functional languages on stock hardware: the Spineless Tagless G-machine. Journal of Functional Programming, 2(2), Google Scholar Lazy thread and task creation in parallel graph-reduction.

In: Clack C., Hammond K., Davie T. (eds) Implementation of Functional Languages. IFL Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. Abstract. This paper shows how lazy functional programs can be made mobile by compiling them for the Java Virtual Machine.

The Haskell compiler it describes is based on the 〈Ν,G〉-machine, which is designed for implementing lazy functional languages on parallel gh this is not the obvious thing to do, it leads to a particularly elegant set of.

This book gives a practical approach to understanding the implementations of non-strict functional languages using lazy graph reduction. The emphasis of the book is on building working prototypes of several functional language implementations (template- instantiation, G-Machine, TIM, parallel G-Machine.

[Show full abstract] G-machine which implements quasisharing. 1 Introduction This report describes a graph reduction technique and implementation for lazy functional-logic languages. Rather than. This is the case of the language LEAF [2, 3], where a logic language is interfaced to the functional language LCA [], which is essentially a functional language obtained by removing logical variables and nondeterminism from the logic language (see Section ).

An extension of BABEL with higher order functions and polymorphic typing has been implemented using a graph narrowing abstract machine (Kuchen et al. [31]) which was designed as an extension of the sequential kernel of a purely functional, parallel (programmed) graph reduction machine (Loogen et al.

[36]) by unification and backtracking. Book Country of Publication: United States uniprocessor architectures that provide support for reduction; parallel graph reduction machines, and hybrid multiprocessor architectures.}, doi = {} Functional languages have recently gained attention as vehicles for programming in a concise and elegant manner.

In addition, it has been. The same program which is executed on the sequential machine runs on the parallel machine, as the parallelism is a feature of the execution model of such languages.

Furthermore, lazy functional. Thunk-lifting is a programtransformation for lazy functional programs. The transforma- tion aims at reducing the amount of heap space allocated to the program when it executes. The pH language is is a parallel, eagerly-evaluated variant of Haskellwith syntactic provisions for loops, barriers, and I- and M- structure storage.

The eager evaluation model of pH is similar to that of Id; the current version of the pH compiler shares a back end with the Id compiler, producing code for the Monsoon dataflow machine. Naylor, M & Runciman, CThe Reduceron: Widening the von Neumann bottleneck for graph reduction using an FPGA.

in O Chitil, Z Horvath & V Zsok (eds), IMPLEMENTATION AND APPLICATION OF FUNCTIONAL LANGUAGES. vol. LNCS, SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, BERLIN, pp.19th International Symposium on Implementation and Application of Functional Languages.lazy languages, although it did not use lazy evaluation because of I-and M-structures • We, along with researchers from many of these groups decided to “standardize”on a common non-strict functional language.

This is what became todays Haskell • In CSG, we worked on a variant called pH, for “parallel .Terms and Conditions: Simon Peyton Jones wrote: My book is now out of print, but it is now available online in its entirety. Book Excerpts: This book is about implementing functional programming languages using lazy graph reduction, and it divides into three parts.

The first part describes how to translate a high-level functional language into an intermediate language, called the lambda.